Contributed Post: Freaking Out About Your Kids Driving? This Post Will Help You Relax

Today, learning to drive is almost a rite of passage. For the first time in their lives, kids are put firmly in charge of their own – and other people’s – when driving a car. It’s a level of responsibility that is denied them throughout their growing up, only to be suddenly thrust upon them in their late teenage years.

For parents, all of this can be quite anxiety-provoking. The idea of their children hurtling around town in a two ton metallic death trap seems like a nightmare situation. And given the accidents that occur on the road, the threat of injury is only too real.

What’s more, the majority of kids don’t give you the luxury of putting it off until you’re older. They hit 16 or 17, and they immediately start nagging you for a car and driving lessons. After all, all their friends are doing it.

The following post is designed to help you not to freak out at the prospect of your kids driving. It’s time for parents to see driving as an opportunity to develop a child’s sense of responsibility, not just something that puts them at risk.

Get Help

As a parent, you didn’t raise your child in isolation. You got help from family, friends, teachers, health professionals, charity workers, babysitters, club leaders and more. And when it comes to learning to drive, things shouldn’t be any different. Parents still need plenty of professional support from people with years of experience in the industry. Some parents try to save money by teaching their kids to drive themselves. But it almost always turns out better getting a driving instructor to do it on your behalf to stop tempers from fraying and to provide incentives to keep lessons up.

The internet is also full of places where you can find out more on theory test procedures and learn how to pass the theory exam. Under current rules, your child usually has about 12 months after passing their theory test to take their practical exam.

Freaking Out About Your Kids Driving? This Post Will Help You Relax - Today, learning to drive is almost a rite of passage. For the first time in their lives, kids are put firmly in charge of their own - and other people’s - when driving a car. It’s a level of responsibility that is denied them throughout their growing up, only to be suddenly thrust upon them in their late teenage years.

Be Even-Handed

Many parents get really worried at the thought of their teenage child being behind the wheel for the first time. So much could go wrong.

But smart parents have found a way to mitigate their fears through the use of a kind of informal “contract.” The agreement states that in order to be allowed to drive a car, the teen has to abide by certain rules. Those rules could include things like their behavior on the road, always wearing your seatbelt, and not getting in a rage with other drivers because of mistakes they make. With a contract in place between parents and children, parents can relax more when their child is away from them behind the wheel.

Car Safety

Finally, it’s worth talking briefly about car safety. Some beginner cars are pretty scant when it comes to safety features. Many don’t even have basics, like anti lock brakes. Though there#s a tradition of giving new driver’s the cheapest cars possible to keep insurance costs down, it might be worth investing in the next model up to get safety features to put your mind at ease.

*This is a collaborative post


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Freaking Out About Your Kids Driving? This Post Will Help You Relax - Today, learning to drive is almost a rite of passage. For the first time in their lives, kids are put firmly in charge of their own - and other people’s - when driving a car. It’s a level of responsibility that is denied them throughout their growing up, only to be suddenly thrust upon them in their late teenage years.
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